Nikon D7000 insight

The best DX format ever

High Speed 6 fps continuous to 100 shots

Capable of shooting up to 100 JPEGs at 6 frames per second, the Nikon D7000 exceeds its predecessor’s utility for action shooting, and Nikon also keeps the pressure on in the ISO sensitivity department, with standard ISOs ranging from 100 to 6,400, but reaching to 25,600 in its expanded range.

In its Continuous High mode, the Nikon D7000 can shoot as many as 100 JPEG-compressed still images at a rate of 6 frames per second — a significant improvement over its predecessor, which was limited to 23 JPEG frames at 4.5 fps. You have more chance to get the best shot.  When lesser burst speed is required, the Continuous Low mode provides anywhere from one to five frames per second shooting.

6fpsImage from Chase Jarvis

High-speed shooting. One shortcoming of previous non-pro Nikon SLRs was the inability to shoot at a fast frame rate when the bit depth was set to 14. But that is no longer a problem with the Nikon D7000. Set your 14-bit depth and fire away at six frames per second. You can also shoot at 12-bit if you want smaller file sizes, but you gain no speed advantage. Six frames-per-second is pretty fast, not bad for shooting sports and other action. It’s not as significant as eight frames per second, but it’s still respectable, and a long way from the standard three frames per second on entry-level models.

 
D7000
D300s
D700
D90
D5000
D3100
D3000
D40
Frame Rate
6 FPS
7/8* FPS
5/8* FPS
4.5 FPS
4 FPS
3 FPS
3 FPS
2.5 FPS
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